How To Create a Story For Your Content Marketing

How To Create Your Content Marketing StoryContent marketing is all about storytelling. Without a story, it's a lot harder to create content (and it's a lot harder to have a reason to create that content). In this post, I want to help you think more clearly about the story behind your business so you can do a better job building more impactful messages and a better content marketing campaign. Let's dive in...

Why You Need A Story
First, you might be wondering what storytelling has to do with business and marketing in the first place. Every business needs a good story. The story is what connects your customers to your product or service, and it's what helps explain what the French would call your "raison d'ĂȘtre" (your "reason for existence"). Without a story, you're simply another business simply trying to peddle your products.

I firmly believe every business needs a story, though the role it plays will vary from business-to-business and market-to-market.

How To Create A Story For Your Content Marketing

Your story can originate from a lot of different places and angles. You might literally take the story of your own life or your own success. Or you might create a fantasy that you share with your customers.

For example, the story behind Starbucks based around Howard Schulz' idea of "the third place" (not home, not work, but your local coffee shop) and how he discovered this concept in Europe and wanted to bring it to America. That story is the foundation of virtually all of Starbucks' marketing and business decisions. It creates mystique and intrigue around the business, and it creates a unique company culture for management, employees, and customers alike.

When creating your business story, look to your background and your inspiration for starting your company. If you're not the original founder, look to the history of your company and why they started the business.

Your story can and should change/evolve with time. But spend time crafting a story that has some strong, lasting elements.

How To Tell Your Story

Once you create your story, you'll need to tell it. It's not usually necessary to come right out with your story directly. It should be presented in lots of subtle ways to your customers. It should be hinted at in every email marketing message you send out, the presentation of your website, the ideas behind your blog posts, your products and services, etc.

Don't beat your customers over the head with your story. Rather, use it to inspire your marketing and your messaging strategy.

The goal of storytelling in Content Marketing is to have a larger message with which you can engage your customers. Again, your goal is to create a deeper relationship that transcends a simple buyer-seller transaction.

What about you? How are you using storytelling in your business? Leave your comments below about this post, "How To Create a Story For Your Content Marketing."

Author: Jason Clegg

Jason Clegg is the CEO & Founder of Convert With Content. He's on a MISSION to help small businesses convert tire-kickers into lifetime customers & raving fans with #ConvertWithContent marketing systems that work! His secret weapon is Infusionsoft.

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3 Responses to “How To Create a Story For Your Content Marketing”

  1. I think this is a really great way to drive content marketing, and it’s certainly something that I’ll be thinking about in the coming days when I’m trying to plan the upcoming content for the company I’m working for.

    I have a question about the Starbucks example given above: it seems to me like the idea of the third space is Starbucks’ unique value proposition (or it would have been; it’s not so unique anymore!). How does a USP figure into this kind of story? Are they usually closely related?

    • Jason Clegg says:

      Good question, Dann. I do think this is open for debate, but I find their “3rd place” concept more about storytelling than about USP. As you point out, any coffee house can be a third place but only Starbucks makes a big deal about it in their storytelling. :)

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